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We provide two pathways to the content. Thematic (chapters that address certain themes, e.g. cultivation, regardless of crop or animal type) and Product (chapters that relate to a specific type of crop or animal). Choose the most applicable route to find the right collection for you. 
 
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Apples collection

Code: 91487
This collection includes 29 chapters that cover both the individual crop and key steps in the value chain for crop cultivation, from breeding to harvest.

To download the list of chapters in this collection click here
£363.00
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A selection of chapters in this collection:
Apple mosaic virus: biology, epidemiology and detection: Karel Petrzik, Biology Centre CAS, Czech Republic
Apple replant disease: causes and management: Zhiquan Mao and Yanfang Wang, Shandong Agricultural University, China
Epidemiology and management of apple scab: Tom Passey and Xiangming Xu, NIAB EMR, UK
Fungal diseases of fruit: apple canker in Asia: Baohua Li, Qingdao Agricultural University, China
Fungal diseases of fruit: apple cankers in Europe: Robert Saville and Leone Olivieri, NIAB EMR, UK
Advances and challenges in apple breeding: Amanda Karlström, NIAB EMR and University of Reading, UK; Magdalena Cobo Medina, NIAB EMR and University of Nottingham, UK; and Richard Harrison, NIAB EMR, UK
Advances and challenges in sustainable apple cultivation: Pierre-Éric Lauri and Sylvaine Simon, INRA, France
Advances in post-harvest storage and handling of apples: Christopher B. Watkins, Cornell University, USA
Advances in soil and nutrient management in apple cultivation: G. H. Neilsen, D. Neilsen and T. Forge, Summerland Research and Development Centre Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; and K. Hannam, Natural Resources Canada
Advances in understanding apple tree growth: rootstocks and planting systems: Dugald Close, University of Tasmania, Australia
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