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Exploiting the genetic diversity of ornamentals

Code: 9781786767141
Yoo Gyeong Park, Gyeongsang National University, Republic of Korea; Young Hoon Park, Pusan National University, Republic of Korea; Abinaya Manivannan, National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, Republic of Korea; Prabhakaran Soundararajan, National Institute of Agricultural Science, Republic of Korea; and Byoung Ryong Jeong, Gyeongsang National University, Republic of Korea

Chapter synopsis: Germplasm is important in maintaining genetic resources for plants because it encompasses living genetic resources that new plants can be grown from. Nursery (field) storage, pollen storage, seed collections, and in vitro storage are ways plant germplasm can be stored, and constitute what is called a germplasm bank. Such germplasm banks are maintained so that they can represent unique plants specific to a region, wild relatives of different plants, and the genetic diversity of plants. Germplasm banks are an important diversity conservation strategy. Common species, as well as rare, threatened, and endangered species are made available by such germplasm banks, for habitat restoration projects, and research. This chapter discusses collecting, conserving, and utilizing ornamental germplasm such as roses and cacti as the examples to capitalize the genetic diversity.

DOI: £25.00
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Table of contents 1 Introduction 2 Management of ornamental germplasm to exploit genetic diversity: collection strategy 3 In situ conservation methods 4 Ex situ conservation 5 Management of plant genetic resources in the Republic of Korea and in Japan 6 Management of plant genetic resources in the United States 7 Management of plant genetic resources in Canada 8 Management of plant genetic resources in Europe 9 Utilizing ornamental germplasm to exploit genetic diversity in roses 10 Utilizing ornamental germplasm to exploit genetic diversity in cacti 11 Conclusions 12 References

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